Posts Tagged ‘ohio river steamboats’

Capstan Patent

Wednesday, January 11th, 2017

Capt John Smith McMillin was born on 23 Jul 1817 in Georgetown, PA.  During the Civil War, he achieved considerable fame for fearlessly running the batteries at Vicksburg as the owner and master of the steamer Silver Wave.  He was also an inventor. In that role, he was awarded a US Patent for the invention of the steam-powered capstan.[1]  The capstan patent was a Letters Patent No 63,917, granted on 16 Apr 1867 to John S McMillin for “an improvement in applying steam-power to the capstans of steamboats and other craft”. [2]

 

The steam-powered capstan patent was contested in court in at least two cases.  One suit, McMillan[3] v Rees[4] (17 OG, 1222), was filed against John S McMillin to “restrain the infringement” of the patent.  The circuit court opinions issued in both cases were not in favor of Capt McMillin.   The capstan patent was declared void “for want of any patentable invention”.  The basic arrangement of “shafts and cog-wheels” of the capstan was unchanged.  In the case against McMillin, the argument was that the modification to steam power did not warrant the issue of a patent because there was no “ingenuity of merit”, only the “ordinary judgement and skill of a trained mechanic”.   Capstans and steam engines were old technology, well known elements used in many places including grist mills and steamboats.      

 

Capt McMillin appealed the decisions.  On 17 Nov 1884, the Supreme Court of the US decided:

 

Upon the ground stated, we think the letters patent upon which the suit is based are void.  The decree of the circuit court by which the patent was sustained must therefore be reversed and the cause remanded with direction to dismiss the bill, and it is so ordered.  [5]

 

The history of the patent process was long and curious.  The first application for the patent was filed by Capt McMillin on 23 Jul 1855.  This application was rejected.   On 7 Feb 1856, the application was amended.  This amended application was also rejected.  Eleven years later, the application awarded the patent included the drawings and specifications of the first application unchanged.  The steam-powered capstan had been in wide use for more than a decade without any new state of the art developments or improvements.   That was the defense relied on to defeat the patent in court.              

 

More research is required to determine whether John S McMillin was demanding royalties from other steamboat owners and lines. 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes and References.



[1]   A capstan was a spool device mounted on the steamboat deck used for winding up heavy rope.  With booms and block-and-tackle, a capstan was used to move heavy loads on and off the boat.  It was also used when “sparring” the boat over sandbars.   Before the steam-power improvement, the cylinder was turned by muscle power.    

[2]   Decisions of the Commissioner of Patents and of the US Courts in Patent Cases for the Year 1884, Washington Government Printing Office, 1884, p472.

[3]  McMillin was misspelled, or at least spelled differently.  In the two lower court challenges, the name is spelled with an “in” on one docket and “”an” on the other.  Adding to the confusion, the name McMillen is found on markers in Georgetown Cemetery.   Changing the spelling of a family name was not uncommon at that time in our history.  Such changes occurred between generations rather than within a family.  That makes this case unusual.  

[4]   Rees is a famous steamboat family from Pittsburgh.   Thomas M, James H, or William, or the Rees firm could have filed the complaint.

[5]   Decisions of the Commissioner of Patents and of the US Courts in Patent Cases for the Year 1884, Washington Government Printing Office, 1884, p475.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright © 2017 Francis W Nash
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No part of this website may be reproduced without permission in writing from the author.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Georgetown Historical Markers

Sunday, November 20th, 2016

 

Foundations (Beaver Area heritage Foundation News Fall 2016)C

Foundations, the news for members of The Beaver Area Heritage Foundation, arrived by post a few days ago.  The column on the Lewis and Clark Legacy Expedition dedication caught my interest.  One of the five places in Beaver County where Lewis and Clark signs were recently erected was Georgetown.  The caption reads: 

 “A leaky canoe was purchased here and they got stuck on a bar just below town”.  [1]

 Not a happy experience for Merriweather Lewis no doubt.  

 

Of all the American rivers, the Ohio is the most important.  By way of the Ohio more than any other route, the whole continent was explored and populated.  Little known Georgetown, Beaver County, PA is located at Ohio River Mile Marker 38.9 from Pittsburgh.  It is a river town of lost elegance and importance.  Once there were hotels, taverns, general stores, a ferry, and wrought iron fenced homes with second story porches that spilled music into the warm summer nights.  One wealthy resident even had a private airport through the 1950’s.  Sadly little of that era is left.  Like many of the towns along the Ohio, the old homes in Georgetown need repair.  The hotels and taverns are gone.  Only the churches remain.   

 

The Lewis and Clark Expedition legacy marker recently installed by the Beaver County Historical Research and Landmarks Foundation (BCHR&LF) is a two-part interpretive marker:  the triangular sign is a trail marker and the rectangular sign contains a comment from the journal kept by Capt Lewis.  A little-known fact is that Lewis in 1794 served as a member of the detachment of VA militia involved in putting down the Whiskey Rebellion.  People in western PA, and most probably Georgetown, were rebels in that cause.  The old family names, Dawson, Poe, Calhoon, and Mackall, were frontiersmen in Georgetown well before 1794 and long after 1803.        

 

Slowly, I have become aware that the streets of Georgetown, which I had walked every day as a child, had a broad, hidden history.  The Beaver County Historical Society put up a plaque, along Market St not far from my home dedicated to the Georgetown rivermen and the Lewis and Clark Expedition. [2]      At least eight other historical markers are, as the crow flies, within a one mile radius of this marker.

 

St Luke’s Episcopal Church (Beaver County Historical Research and Landmarks Foundation)

A few hundred feet south in a direct line is the marker for St Luke’s Episcopal Church (now Anglican Church).  The first minister to the people of St Luke’s parish was Rev John L Taylor in 1814.  On 11 Jun 1833, John Bever a tavern owner and surveyor deeded the lots to the Episcopal Church on which the

St Luke’s Episcopal Church Marker (Beaver County Historical Research and Landmarks Foundation)

present building was erected.  The first service was held on 15 Dec 1833.  It is fitting to mention that every Episcopal Church in the upper Ohio Valley has been a direct result of St Luke’s and the godly men who ministered there.

 

PA-VA Boundary 1785 (Beaver County Historical Research and Landmarks Foundation)

At the entry to town there is another marker noting the survey of the western boundary of PA completed in 1785.  About one-quarter of a mile down river one of the original stone markers from the survey of 1785 stills exists.   [3]

 

Nearby historical markers include The Point of Beginning [4], The Sandy and Beaver Canal,  the First Paper Mill/Little Beaver Creek Bridge, and Smiths Ferry are directly opposite Georgetown on the north side of the Ohio River.  The Death of Pretty Boy Floyd Historical Marker is just outside this arbitrary range.

 

Georgetown has at least eight historical markers and one-hundred-seventy-four residents per the 2010 census.  It should have more markers, and more residents.  The Georgetown Cemetery deserves a marker.  The oldest stone in the cemetery is dated 1795.  Small American flags flying from their holders in front of headstones denote the graves of Revolutionary War or War of 1812 or Civil War or Spanish-American War or World War I and WW II veterans.  Many steamboat pilots and captains also rest in peace there.  The River Hotel, which was built in 1802, deserves a marker.  Rivermen, hard-working, hard-drinking, hard-fighting men that most river towns dreaded to see stop, stayed there. The Post office was established in 1802 – second in Beaver County after Frankfort Springs.  It deserves a marker.  The Georgetown United Methodist Church was built in 1877 by steamboat builders and carpenters deserves a marker for its unique architecture.  The Indian Rocks, located in Smiths Ferry, were destination landmarks until flooded by the last series of dams were installed on the Ohio.  Although the petroglyphs will presumably never be uncovered, their history should not be forgotten.  Finally, the frontier fort in Georgetown should be remembered with a marker.

Many private homes in Georgetown qualify for the Beaver County Historical Research & Landmarks Foundation Heritage Marker Program but few owners have applied.

 

A classy small town with a big history – Georgetown.

 

 

 

 

Copyright © 2016 Francis W Nash
All Rights Reserved

No part of this website may be reproduced without permission in writing from the author.

 



[1]   Quotation from the journal of Merriweather Lewis in 1803.

[2]  This marker was erected by the Beaver County Historical Research and Landmarks Foundation.
It is included in the Beaver County (PA) Historical Research and Landmarks Foundation marker series.

[3]  The cut-stone marker is on private property owned by FirstEnergy Corp.  Permission must be obtained to visit these national treasures.

[4]  Different historical societies have installed multiple markers commemorating elements of the same basic event – the completion of the survey of the western boundary of PA which opened the Northwest Territory for settlement.  The additional markers include Beginning Point of the US Public Land Survey, Gateway to the Northwest, Land Ordinance of 1785, and The Seven Ranges.

Cannonballs

Saturday, May 21st, 2016

 

Cannon Shot (Frances and John Finley Collection)

This week I brought eight cannonballs to Carlisle from Georgetown.  The munitions were associated with the cannon given to Georgetown after the capture of Gen Morgan and his Raiders near New Lisbon, OH in Jul 1863.  My trip to Carlisle with the canon shot included passing through six tunnels: two in Pittsburgh (Ft Pitt and Squirrel Hill) and four along the PA Turnpike (Allegheny, Tuscarora, Kittatinny, and Blue).   None of the tunnels permit flammable or explosive materials.  Whew!  It was a daring trip.  

 

One piece of shot was missing.  Eight balls, two rings and, two plates made the trip to Carlisle.  The total weight was approximately forty lbs.

 

 

Tom and Jack Kinsey ca 1928 Riding the Georgetown Cannon (Courtesy of the Kinsey Family Personal Collection)

One surviving image of the Georgetown cannon is a photo of the Kinsey boys, Tom and Jack, riding the big gun in about 1928. 

 

In 1942 the Georgetown council voted to donate the memorial cannon to the nationwide drive for scrap metal in support of the WW II effort.  Obviously, the cannonballs were not included in the donation.  The solid shot balls with their stands have been stored for many years in my Aunt Frances Finley’s basement. 

 

My neighbor, who is a professor at the Army War College in Carlisle and an expert on all things Civil War, and his associates have viewed the image of the Georgetown cannon.  The identity and model of the cannon remain undetermined.  To date the team of historians have not seen the cannonballs from Georgetown.  The munitions, combined with the image,  will hopefully help to identify the model of artillery. 

 

The scanned table below identifies the Civil War era cannons manufactured at the Ft Pitt Foundry.  More than 2,000 heavy guns were forged for the Federal Ordnance Department of the US government.  In other words  approximately 60% of all of the heavy artillery purchased by the Federal government came from Pittsburgh.  The Ft Pitt Foundry did not produce field artillery pieces during the war. [1]

 

Heavy Artillery Pieces manufactured at the Ft Pitt Foundry during the Civil War (Arthur B Fox)

 

 

 

Reference.


 

[1] Arthur B Fox, Pittsburgh During the American Civil War 1860-1865, (Mechling Bookbindery, 2002), p149.

 

 

 


Copyright © 2016  Francis W Nash   All Rights Reserved

No part of this website may be reproduced without permission in writing from the author.

 

Steamboat Photos

Friday, August 14th, 2015

A wonderful series of steamboat photos has been posted on the East Liverpool Historiical Society website.  The images are attributed to Jim Paulaskas of Chester, WV.

 

The photos were taken in Georgetown, PA by members of the Capt Andrew Parr family circa 1899.

 

 

 

Copyright © 2015 Francis W Nash All Rights Reserved

No part of this website may be reproduced without permission in writing from the author.

 

Capt Thomas Potts

Monday, August 25th, 2014

Cat Thomas Potts (Beaver Valley Times, Oct 24, 1973

A short history written by Gladys L Hoover in 1973 contains invaluable local history of Georgetown and its two churches:  St Luke’s Episcopal Church and the Methodist Episcopal Church.  Both faiths have changed their original affiliations since Capt Thomas Potts’ time due to the many splits and mergers in the Methodist and Episcopal Churches.     The wife of Capt Thomas Potts according to this newspaper article, raised a considerable sum of money in 1877 for the building fund of the new Methodist Church.

 

 

 

 

Copyright © 2014 Francis W Nash
All Rights Reserved.

Local History at the Hookstown Fair

Friday, August 1st, 2014

Mr Myron Elliot recently visited me in Carlisle, PA.  He was “walking Gettysburg” yet took some time to visit me.  He wanted to use some of the Georgetown local history on this site at the community tent at the Hookstown Fair.   The 2014 fair will run from 19-23 Aug.

 

The rich early history of the south side of the Ohio River is based largely on eye witness accounts described in letters, journals, and a few books.  The stories are fantastic.  Most of the original documents have been lost forever or are maintained in private collections.  Either way original sources are scattered and hard to come by.

 

If you are in the area, make time to visit the Hoookkstown Fair and its Historic Village.

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright © 2014 Francis W Nash
All Rights Reserved

Two Ohio River Maps

Sunday, March 30th, 2014

Two interesting maps for your review.  The first map lists all of the frontier forts and blockhouses on the upper Ohio River between 1775 and 1795.  A brutal time in our history when we were not quite civilized.  The map was adapted by Stephen Lazzaro from the illustration in “Every Home a Fort, Every Man a Warrior” written by Michael E Nogay.  The revised map identifies the frontier fort in Georgetown, PA.  Mr Lazzaro and I agreed to name the outpost Fort Reardon’s Bottom, although in 1777 Major Henry Taylor referred to the it in military correspondence as “the Chief of the old posts”.  The word fort preceding the location defines the fort as a “public” fort.  Public forts were manned by regular US Army troops and supplied at the taxpayers expense.  The fort in Georgetown was manned by Continental Army troops.  There is a warm poetic ring to the name.  It is the first map I have seen with the Georgetown fort listed.

Adapted by Stephen Lazzaro from Dennis R Jones’ Illustration for Michael E Nogay’s “Every Home a Fort, Every Mana Warrior”

 

The second map is the obverse of an advertisement (ca 1925) that lists the steamboat stops and railroad connections on the upper Ohio River.  The two maps provide the boundary in time for Georgetown – a boundary between the founding of our country and the Golden Age of Steamboats.   

Steamboat and RR Connections ca 1925 (Anna L and John F Nash Collection)

 

 

Copyright © 2014 Francis W Nash
All Rights Reserved

 

Civil War Exploits of Andrew Poe

Saturday, March 22nd, 2014

African American Civil War Monument (F Nash Collection 2015)

Andrew Poe, the son of Rev Adam Poe (co-founder of Ohio Wesleyan College), earned the rank of Captain in the Civil War.  Andrew first enlisted at age 35 as a private with Co A of the 63rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry on 25 Jan 1862.  He was commissioned Captain of Company C in the 106th Regiment, US Colored Infantry from 16 May 1864 till 14 Nov 1864.  Then he was transferred to Company C of the 40th Regiment, US Colored Infantry.  The 40th  and 106th Regiments were consolidated on 7 Nov 1864.  [1]  He was mustered out on 25 Apr 1865.[2]   The dates seem a bit off.  Some time at the African American Civil War Museum will untangle the dates.

 

Andrew Poe is listed on the memorial wall of the African American Civil War Memorial and Museum in Washington, DC.  Andrew’s name is engraved on Wall C plaque 55 and plaque 103.  The 40th US Colored Infantry troops are honored on plaque 55; the 106th on plaque 103.  The museum website link follows:

 

 

http://afroamcivilwar.org/home.html

 

Andrew Poe, 106th Regiment USCT ( F Nash Collection 2015)

After the war in a letter to General Clinton B Fisk of the Freedmen’s Bureau, Andrew wrote about a battle where he fought with his men until only seven of them survived. The site of the battle has not yet been determined.

 

“I fought until only seven of my men stood living beside me.  The graves of my poor men and of our enemies are witnesses that I tried to do a soldiers duty.  Long as I could be with the men whom I had personally rescued from Slavery and whose perils and imprisonment I had shared, I preferred my Company . . .”

 

Andrew Poe 40th Regiment USCT (F Nash Collection 2015)

Rev Adam Poe’s brother, Daniel had a son named Andrew A Poe. (Daniel was a Methodist Episcopal missionary in Texas who died the same day as his wife in Matagorda, TX.  The cause of their deaths is not known.)  Andrew A enlisted with Company D, Ohio 1st LA Batty( Light Artillery Battery) on 15 Aug 1862.  He was promoted to full Corporal on 15 Jun 1864.  He was killed at Kennesaw Mountain and was buried at Marietta National Cemetery.

 

Rev Adam Poe’s brother Charles, not a minister, was the father of Gen Orlando Metcalf Poe.  Orlando served as a Colonel under Gen Sherman on the march to Savannah.  As Sherman’s chief engineer he orchestrated the burning of Atlanta, for which action he was honored by Sherman and hated by the entire confederacy.

 

    

Rev Adam Poe’s son and two nephews have quite a record.  They were Union men.  Their loyalties were deeply felt.  They were fearless soldiers much like their great grandfather Adam and his brother Andrew who were famed for their Revolutionary War service and their frontier battles with the Indians along the Ohio River in southern Beaver County, PA.  The Revolutionary War militiaman, Andrew, engaged the Wyandot Indian Chief Bigfoot in hand to hand combat in arguably the most famous bit of history of the Ohio frontier.

 

Rev Adam Poe’s son and two nephews were first cousins once removed from the steamboat captains of Georgetown, PA:  Andrew, Jacob, Adam W, Thomas W, and George W.   I often wonder whether paths crossed.  Could my Georgetown steamboat captains have transported their OH cousins to their Union duty stations in the western theater?  Think about that for a few moments.

 

 

 

 

63rd Regiment, Ohio Infantry

Overview:

Organized at Marietta, Ohio, by consolidation of Battalions of the 22nd and 63rd Ohio Infantry January 25, 1862. Moved to Paducah, Ky., February 18-23, thence to Commerce, Mo. Attached to 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, Army of the Mississippi, to April, 1862, 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, Army of the Mississippi, to November, 1862. 1st Brigade, 8th Division, Left Wing 13th Army Corps (Old), Dept. of the Tennessee, to December, 1862. 1st Brigade, 8th Division, 16th Army of the Tennessee, to March, 1863. 4th Brigade, District of Corinth, Miss., 2nd Division, 16th Army Corps, to May, 1863. 3rd Brigade, District of Memphis, 5th Division, 16th Army Corps, to November, 1863. Fuller’s Brigade, 2nd Division, 16th Army Corps, to March, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 16th Army Corps, to September, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 17th Army Corps, to July, 1865.

Service:

Operations against New Madrid, Mo., March 3-14, 1862. Siege and capture of Island Number 10, Mississippi River, and pursuit to Tiptonville, March 15-April 8. Tiptonville April 8. Expedition to Fort Pillow, Tenn., April 13-17. Moved to Hamburg Landing, Tenn., April 18-23. Action at Monterey April 29. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Skirmish at Farmington May 1. Reconnoissance toward Corinth May 8. Occupation of Corinth May 30, and pursuit to Booneville May 30-June 12. Duty at Clear Creek till August 29. Battle of Iuka, Miss., September 19. Reconnoissance from Rienzi to Hatchie River September 30. Battle of Corinth October 3-4. Pursuit to Ripley October 6-12. Grant’s Central Mississippi Campaign, operations on the Mississippi Central Railroad November 2, 1862, to January 12, 1863. Expedition to Jackson after Forest December 18, 1862, to January 3, 1863. Action at Parker’s Cross Roads December 30, 1862. Red Mound, or Parker’s Cross Roads, December 31. Lexington, Tenn., January 3, 1863. Moved to Corinth, Miss., January 9, and duty there till April. Dodge’s Expedition into Northern Alabama April 15-May 8. Rock Cut, near Tuscumbia, April 22. Tuscumbia April 23. Town Creek April 28. Duty at Memphis, Tenn., till October 18. Movement to Prospect, Tenn., October 18 November 30, and duty there till January, 1864. Veterans absent on Furlough January 2 to February 28, 1864. Decatur, Ala., March 8. Duty at Decatur till May. Atlanta Campaign May 1-September 8. Demonstrations on Resaca May 8-13. Sugar Valley near Resaca May 9. Battle of Resaca May 14-15. Advance on Dallas May 18-25. Operations on line of Pumpkin Vine Creek and battles about Dallas, New Hope Church and Allatoona Hills May 25-June 5. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 2. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Nickajack Creek July 2-5. Ruff’s Mills July 3-4. Chattahoochie River July 5-17. Decatur and Battle of Atlanta July 22. Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25. Ezra Chapel July 28. Flank movement on Jonesboro August 25-30. Battle of Jonesboro August 31-September 1. Lovejoy Station September 2-6. At East Point till October 4. Pursuit of Hood into Alabama October 4-26. March to the sea November 15-December 10. Montieth Swamp December 9. Siege of Savannah December 10-21. Campaign of the Carolinas January to April, 1865. Reconnoissance to the Salkehatchie River, S. C., January 20. Salkehatchie Swamps February 2-5. Skirmishes at Rivers and Broxton Bridges February 2. Action at Rivers Bridge February 3. Binnaker’s Bridge, South Edisto River, February 9. Orangeburg February 12-13. Columbia February 16-17. Battle of Bentonville, N. C., March 20-21. Occupation of Goldsboro March 24. Advance on Raleigh April 10-14. Occupation of Raleigh April 14. Bennett’s House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. March to Washington, D. C., via Richmond, Va., April 29-May 20. Grand Review May 24. Moved to Louisville, Ky., June 5, and duty there till July. Mustered out July 8, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 2 Officers and 91 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 5 Officers and 259 Enlisted men by disease. Total 357. [3]

 

 40th United States Colored Infantry

The 40th United States Colored Infantry was organized at Nashville, Tennessee, in February

1864. The 40th USCI spent its entire service guarding railroad lines and depots in

Tennessee. Its primary responsibilities were guard duty along the Nashville and Louisville

Railroad, the Northwestern Railroad, and railroad depots in the District of East Tennessee.

The regiment fought a skirmish at South Tunnel, near Gallatin, on October 10, 1864. The

40th USCI mustered out of service on April 25, 1866.[4]

 

 

106th Regiment Infantry

Organized May 16, 1864, from 4th Alabama Colored Infantry. Attached to District of North Alabama, Dept. of the Cumberland, to February, 1865. Defenses of Nashville & Northwestern Railroad, Dept. of the Cumberland, to November, 1865.

SERVICE.–Garrison at Pulaski and railroad guard duty entire term. Forest’s attack on Athens, Ala., September 23-24, 1864. Consolidated with 40th United States Colored Troops November 7, 1865.[5]

 

 

 

References.



[1]  http://www.bgsu.edu/colleges/library/cac/cwar/063ovib.html

[2]  http://www.bgsu.edu/colleges/library/cac/cwar/063ovib.html

[3]  http://www.nps.gov/civilwar/search-regiments-detail.htm?regiment_id=UOH0063RI

4  http://www.archives.gov/research/microfilm/m1993.pdf

5  http://www.civilwararchive.com/Unreghst/uncolinf4.htm#106

 

Copyright © 2014 Francis W Nash
All Rights Reserved

 

New Bio of Thomas W Poe

Monday, March 3rd, 2014

The Capt Thomas Washington Poe biography was updated yet it still is incomplete.  Information from the Certificates of Enrollment for his later steamboats will not be added until I have made time to review the appropriate volumes at The National Archives. 

 

Copyright © 2014 Francis W Nash
All Rights Reserved

Steamboat Memorabilia

Monday, January 20th, 2014

The str Senator Cordill has quite a history.  According to Way’s packet directory, on 27 Jan 1903 the str Senator Cordill participated in the anniversary when the Yazoo River put Vicksburg back on the river.  In 1920, str Senator Cordill was sold and put in the Pittsburgh Charleston trade.  In 1929 str Senator Cordill was purchased by the Ohio River Transportation Co and put in the Pittsburgh Cincinnati trade.  The following travel brochure indicates that the steamer had been “catering to tourists for six years” which means that the river tour document was issued between the years 1926-1929. 

 

Str Senator Codill ca 1920 (Anna L and John F Nash Colleciton)

One of the points of historical interest was “the scene of the famous fight between Adam Poe and the Indian Big Foot”.

 

Capt Frederick Way Jr and Judy Nash in Georgetown, PA in 1971 (Anna L and John F Nash Collection)

Another reason this particular packet is important is that Frederick Way, Jr was its master-pilot in 1931 and pilot in 1932, 1933, and 1934.  The str Senator Cordill sank in Dam 14 on 5 Feb 1934.  The pilots at the time were Wilsie Miller and Fred Way, Jr.  It was unclear who was at the wheel at the time of the incident.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright © 2014 Francis W Nash
All Rights Reserved