Str Yorktown b1864

The Yorktown was a sternwheel packet built in Freedom, PA in 1864 with a rated capacity of 253 tons.  Capt Jacob Poe, the initial owner, brought her out in Oct 1864 for a Pittsburgh to Louisville trip.  From the files of the Pittsburgh “Commercial” dated 28 Oct 1864:  “The new and pretty Yorktown, Capt Poe, leaves for Louisville Saturday. ”  In Jan 1865, Capt George W Ebert bought control of the packet with Standish Peppard in the office.  Her main route was Pittsburgh to Cincinnati with an occasional trip to Nashville.[1]  In Mar 1866, Standish Peppard hired as his second clerk a son who had served three years with the Union Army.  Unfortunately, the first name was not given because two of his sons served.

 

Montanna and Idaho Transportation Line Boarding Pass (The Ken Robison Collection)

Montanna and Idaho Transportation Line Boarding Pass (The Ken Robison Collection)

In 1867, Capt Ebert transported cargo to St Louis and from there made his first trip to Ft Benton.  On Mar 30, the Yorktown left St Louis and on Jun 11  docked at the levee in Ft Benton.  Seventy-four days on the Missouri from St Louis to Ft Benton.  One notable passenger was  Thomas C Power with goods to start the TC Power mercantile firm.  TC Power later became one of the first two senators from Montana.  The Yorktown carried 210 tons of cargo and 15 passengers up and carried 10 passengers and an unknown amount of freight down.  There was a delay departing Ft Benton due to the scarcity of cord wood.  The Yorktown departed on Jun 30. [2] 

Mapquest of River Route to Ft Benton.

Mapquest of River Route to Ft Benton.

In Mar of 1868, the Yorktown was advertised in Pittsburgh for the mountains with Capt Ebert in command and Standish Peppard in the office.  Arriving in Ft Benton on Jun 14 with 125 tons of freight and 50 passengers, the boom of the gold rush was fading.  Downward cargo, if any, was unrecorded.

Str Yorktown Cabin Passage in 1868 (F Nash Collection)

Str Yorktown Cabin Passage in 1868 (F Nash Collection)

 

The Yorktown was off the books in 1869.  [3]  Whether the engines and other machinery were transferred to a new boat is unknown.

 

References.

 


[1] Frederick Way, Jr.,Way’s Packet Directory, 1848-1994, (Ohio University Press, Athens 1994), p. 493-494.
[2]  Joel Overholser, Fort Benton World’s Innermost Port, (River & Plains Society, 1987), p. 61,64.
[3]  Frederick Way, Jr.,Way’s Packet Directory, 1848-1994, (Ohio University Press, Athens 1994), p. 493-494.

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